Paddington – Find Out Who Dunnit

I like to read when I go on holiday, but no longer take a library book -the reason being that I once left my book in the hotel room. Apart from the inconvenience of paying the fine for very late return (i.e. never) I had to wait until the library got a replacement to find out “who dunnit”. I could blame the lapse on the strange packing phenomenon where everything that fitted nicely into luggage on the journey out, yet somehow refuses to fit on the way home. However, on this occasion that wasn’t an excuse as I was staying in a hotel near Paddington station, ready to travel out to the airport to start the holiday for real. That journey started very early – hence the convenience of staying close to the station.

Paddington Station Clock - Flickr CC nicksarebi

Who Did Dunnit?

Returning to my earlier reference – the book in question was an Agatha Christie. Adding to the air of mystery, I cannot remember which one it was, only that I had recently seen “The Mousetrap” in St. Martin’s Theatre, London and so had decided to read more of her work. As all who attend the performance are asked – I cannot reveal the ending…

Note that “The Mousetrap” was not created as a novel but was originally a radio play, “Three Blind Mice”. One of the great author’s novels “4.50 From Paddington” is actually more reflective of my journey on that occasion!

Please Look After This Book – Thank You!

Of late, Harry Potter has more publicity in literary terms in relation to London stations; however one of the originals is Paddington Bear, so named after the author – Michael Bond – noticed a teddy bear in a London store near the station.

Paddington Bear - Flickr CC acme

Along with adding to the popularity of marmalade and Darkest Peru (not on the direct line from Paddington), the character is also well-known for his label:

“Please look after this bear. Thank you.”

I do enjoy reading a “children’s book” on holiday also, as they are so easy to dip in and out of and if I do fail to “look after this book” and leave it behind, perhaps a child will get to read it after me.

This process of finishing a book and deliberately passing it on in a virtual manner is possible at Book Crossing, or of course you can continue the old-fashioned way by “accidentally” leaving one in your hotel – or on a train!

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